P!nk – “Hurts 2B Human” | Album Review

P!nk is continuing down the more mature sounding path on her latest album, Hurts 2B Human, but ends up being her least interesting album in a very long time!

Following Beautiful Trauma at the end of 2017, we saw P!nk straying away from her solely pop-rock sound and taking a slightly more mature-pop sound, which was perfectly okay as it still incorporated all the bits we loved from the star – and the ballad-heavy album just showed off how powerful her vocals actually are.

Hurts 2B Human was preceded by four songs, all showing off the different sides of P!nk.

Lead single, “Walk Me Home” was a euphoric, folk-inspired track with a chorus epic enough to consume you, a track with that was slightly different to her usual, but could lay with the more country-esque tracks.

“Hustle,” the most “P!nk” track on there and also the album opener worked as a pop-rock, bluesy track that offered the usual attitude we get from the star, “don’t fuck with me, and don’t hustle me.”

“Can we Pretend” with Cash Cash went with a little bit dated EDM approach, although the lyrics were pretty brilliant and the title track, featuring Khalid, an atmospheric ballad that didn’t really go anywhere.

It’s safe to say we didn’t really know what we were going to get with this album.

The duets on the album are easily the weakest spots on the album, “90 Days” featuring the brilliant Wrabel, “Love Me Anyway” featuring Chris Stapleton, as well as the previously mentioned tracks just don’t pack the punch or have a believable rapport that we got with “Just Give Me A Reason.”

The highlights of this album are the ballads that sound closest to what we expect from her, and they also allow P!nk’s vocals to soar.

“Courage” and “Happy” are both epic pop ballads that wouldn’t be missing from any of P!nk’s albums from the last decade, with her typical confessional lyrics from her private life that most stars don’t allow us to see, especially on the raw “Happy.”

“Since I was 17, I’ve always hated my body/And it feels like my body’s hated me/Can somebody find me a pill to make me unafraid of me?”

The true star of the album is “Circle Game,” a song that sees P!nk at her most personal, probably the most personal she’s ever been, which is saying something! She discusses becoming the parent she once looked up to and how it’s come so fast.

“For all my hard talk, I’m still just a daddy’s girl/In this hard shell, there’s tiny cracks from a big world/And there’s still monsters in my closet and they want to come and play…And now there’s monsters in her closet and they wanna come and play/And I start looking for my dad to come and make ’em go away.”

There is a problem with the album though, usually, we feel like we get all from P!nk, but here it sounds half-arsed, and while none of the songs are bad, they don’t give us the life to press repeat, only saved by the emotion poured into them.

Check the album out below and let us know what you think in the comments!

2 thoughts on “P!nk – “Hurts 2B Human” | Album Review

  1. I couldn’t possibly disagree more–and judging her fan reaction in social media, I’m not alone. This collection of songs is a powerful mix of styles, emotions, and story-telling. Which is exactly the kind of artist P!nk is. We do agree about Circle Game – I couldn’t help but think of my own daughter as I listened to the track for the first time, and could easily see her saying these things later in her life. If nothing else, and perhaps the reason her fans love her for exactly who she is, she is relatable beyond my understanding. I find myself drawn into her story telling because I am human, and as far as I’m concerned, there’s no other prerequisite needed. I honestly feel bad for those unable to feel the messages of her songs.

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    1. I hear the emotion she pours into them…and every track she has ever done! But I just didn’t feel the connection between me and the music as well as her and her own tracks that I usually do

      Like

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